Celeriac Pancake

FitNews, How To, Meal Planning, Recipes, Veggie of the Month
One of my favorite foods my mother would make growing up was a potato pancake. I loved that greasy potato crisp! My mother rarely cooked so this was always a treat when she made one.  It's funny how these childhood memories translate into adulthood without really realizing it. This memory of my mom making that amazing potato crisp really came back to me when I started to think of recipes for this month.  I know that celeriac pairs well with potatoes and has the consistency needed to make a good pancake crisp. Today’s recipe is a different take on my mother’s recipe. I’ve added celeriac root to add a little flavor and as stated in the last blog it helps to add a little fiber and less carbohydrates than potatoes…
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Celeriac & Yukon Gold Mash

How To, Meal Planning, Recipes, Veggie of the Month
There have been many comments over the past week about the appearance of celeriac. Questions of why would you buy and especially eat something so ugly!  My favorite so far was that it looked like monkey brains. Now I’ve never seen monkey brains so I can’t comment on the accuracy but it did make me feel like I was cooking with something very exotic. It does beg the question of why should I add this in? Does it add a different nutrient that I can’t get from another vegetable? What is the true benefit? To this I would say it has a lot of redeeming qualities. For one it has a very low carbohydrate content but has a ton of good nutrients like fiber, vitamin B6, C and K and…
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Celeriac & Apple Salad

How To, Meal Planning, Recipes, Veggie of the Month
Celery Root or Celeriac, which is it more commonly called, is an odd shaped root vegetable that you most likely looked over while at the grocery store. Surprisingly it is a very popular vegetable in Europe.  In France, in particular, it is commonly used to make Celeraic romeleade.  A basic cole slaw recipe with mayo, mustard, lemon juice and raw shredded celeriac.  This versatile root vegetable can be prepared raw, roasted, boiled,  or mashed.  It can often be found in salads and soups.  Celeriac is cultivated for it’s root which means the celery we often buy and eat is not from this root.  It grows a leafy, whimper looking, stronger tasting celery stems on top. If you find the root with leafy greens on top it means it is fresh.…
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